The river in paintings


Size
12" x 9"
Subject
Water
Media
Painting / Plein-air
Style
Painterly
Chester on the Connecticut River.Chester Marina on the Connecticut River
 


Zoom
Size
9" x 12"
Subject
Seascapes/Marine
Media
Painting / Oil
Style
Painterly
Hamburg Cove Connecticut River A hot day on Hamburg Cove on the Connecticut River.
 


Zoom
Size
16" x 12"
Subject
New England
Media
Painting / Plein-air
Style
Painterly
Old Lyme Connecticut River Viewing the Baldwin bridge from Pilgrim Landing.



            
Zoom
Size
7" x 5" x 1"
Subject
Nautical
Media
Painting / Oil
Style
Plein-Air

ESSEX in AM smooth day beginning on the Connecticut River.Location is at the end of Main St on the dock where all gather to feed the ducks, crab ,fish and watch the sailing

James Pharmacy located on Pennywise Lane.



Old Saybrook is in the #CTSHPO60 #preservation spotlight today. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places is James Pharmacy located on Pennywise Lane. The property is significant for its association with Anna Louise James (1886-1977), the property’s former owner and the first female African-American pharmacist in Connecticut. Anna James graduated from the Brooklyn College of Pharmacy in 1908 and received her license from the State of Connecticut in 1911. She worked in her brother-in-law's pharmacy beginning in 1912. In 1922, she acquired ownership to the building and continued to work and reside there until she retired in 1967. This site is also significant as the birthplace of James' niece, Ann Lane Petry (1908-1997), a famous Harlem Renaissance writer and author of "The Street," the first novel by an African-American woman to sell over 1 million copies. Ann Petry was inducted into the Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame in 1994.

John Tuohy's MY WRITERS SITE: Happiness ...................

John Tuohy's MY WRITERS SITE: Happiness ...................: ABOUT THE AUTHOR John William Tuohy is a writer who lives in Washington DC. He holds an MFA in writing from Lindenwood Unive...

Photos from about 1865

The steamboat City of Hartford after a collision with a bridge.

The remains of a wrecked steamboat in the Connecticut River.
 
Small sailing ships moored for loading and railroad bridge over the Connecticut River in the background
 

 
 

Clarence Daniel Batchelor


Clarence Daniel Batchelor (April 1, 1888 – September 5, 1977) was an editorial cartoonist who was also noted for painting and sculpture. He won a Pulitzer Prize in 1937. Although Batchelor was born in Osage City, Kansas he spent his final years in Deep River and is buried here.  

His journalistic career began in 1911 as a staff artist for the Kansas City Star. From 1914 to 1918 he worked as a free-lance artist, returning to newspapers in 1923 when he worked as a cartoonist in the New York Post for the Ledger Syndicate until 1931. He then found his permanent niche at the New York Daily News, where he worked until 1969.

Batchelor's most famous editorial, published in 1936 in Liberty (general interest magazine), reflected the newspaper's isolationist stance and won the Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning. It depicted a prototypical "Any European Youth" greeted by a skull-faced harlot representing War, captioned "Come on in, I'll treat you right! I used to know your Daddy."

 Sympathetic to women's suffrage, he contributed cartoons to Woman's Journal and The Woman Voter (which merged with the Journal in 1917). He also contributed his art to the causes of public health and public safety.

 



 

 

 

The Deep River waterfront, long long ago